WCSU Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022 : Macricostas School of Arts & Sciences

Social Sciences

Carina Bandhauer, Chair (2020-2022)
bandhauerc@wcsu.edu
Warner Hall 207, Midtown campus
(203) 837-8650
(203) 837-3960 (fax)

Christine Hegel-Cantarella, Associate Chair 
hegelcantarellac@wcsu.edu 
Warner Hall 217, Midtown campus 
(203) 837-3914 
(203) 837-3960 (fax) 

Patricia Lerner, Department Secretary
lernerp@wcsu.edu
Warner Hall 224, Midtown Campus
(203) 837-8484
(203) 837-8905 (fax)

 

Faculty by major program focus:
Anthropology & Sociology
C. Bandhauer, Chair
C. Hegel-Cantarella, Assoc. Chair
M. Misra
R. Whittemore
TBA

Economics
R. Lumbantobing
O. Owoye
Z. Pan

Geography
TBA

Political Science
J. Schofield
H.H. Williams
TBA

 

Adjunct Faculty

E. Abrell R. Manes, Emeritus C. Sgarlata 
R. Brown B. Morrison P.  Southard 
A. El Moustakim  A. Mukherjee   M. Sperrazza  
B. Fitzpatrick B. Ramamurthy   J. TelRav  
M. French J. Regan H. Tokke 
L. Huber M. Saksena  J. Vecchia 
J. Jowdy F. Schneiderman  L. Weinstein, Emeritus 

 

Overview
Social Sciences has a special responsibility to prepare students for the ever-changing demands of contemporary society.  The department provides disciplinary and methodological instruction and practice in the social sciences. To this end, courses are offered in anthropology, economics, geography, political science, sociology and social sciences research methodology. The department awards the B.A. degree in four programs: 1) anthropology and sociology; 2) economics; 3) political science; and 4) interdisciplinary social sciences. 

This curricular effort is supported by department computer and archaeology laboratories. The department’s role in the university-affiliated Jane Goodall Institute generates opportunities for students to become academically involved in the institute’s mission of environmental, conservation and primate studies. Additionally, the department has cooperative departmental cross-listing of some courses and exchange of faculty instruction with several university departments such as communication, art, education, environmental sciences, finance, history and non-western cultures, management (public administration), social work, and the Kathwari Honors Program. 

 The department sponsors a campus chapters of the Political Science Honor Society, Pi Sigma Alpha and the International Honor Society in the Social Sciences, Pi Gamma Mu. Membership in these honors societies gives recognition to scholastic achievement, thereby enhancing employer and graduate admissions consideration. The campus chapters also provide the opportunity for members to contribute their talent for the benefit of the university and general community. Obtain details from the department chairperson. 

 The department also sponsors the Social Sciences Journal, which publishes original research written by students. Students are invited to contribute their essays or research papers for review. Two student editors and one faculty choose and edit the best examples of student work for publication. 

 

Mission
The four social science programs at WCSU provide students with a holistic understanding and critical appreciation of the cultural, political, social, and economic elements of society. The department curriculum presents a broad-based foundation in the social sciences while offering a rich and diverse range of degree programs and options.

B.A.: ANTHROPOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY

The allied fields of anthropology and sociology offer ways of understanding the world that are fundamental to many careers and courses of study. Anthropology and sociology focus on everyday life in cultural and social groups and the systems and structures that condition social life. Both disciplines emphasize the interconnections between different domains of social life  – like healthcarereligion, work, education, etc. – and facets of identity, examining the way they intersect to produce continuity and change, opportunities and inequalities. The program is designed to provide global perspective and comparative social analysis preparation for individuals pursuing varied careers in business, government and social service sectors as well as for advanced graduate studies in a wide area of disciplines. 

B.A.: ECONOMICS

The economics program provides students with an understanding and appreciation of the economic behavior of individuals, business and society. The focus is on social outcomes of economic transactions and activities, as well as on economic performance. In addition to economic efficiency, economics studies the issue of equity, analyzing various social issues from the economic perspective, including inequalities in economic opportunities and discrimination; it examines efforts to remedy those inequities through means of redistribution of income or wealth and their impact on the overall economyEconomics is taught as part of a liberal arts education at Western and provides an especially relevant background for careers in business, finance, international organizations or government, as well as for graduate study in economics, law or business. 

B.A.: POLITICAL SCIENCE

Students of political science are given an opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the political aspects of society. They are provided with a practical background for a variety of legal, government, public and social service careers, and a preparation for graduate studies in political science, as well as in related fields, such as pre-law.

B.A.: SOCIAL SCIENCES

This interdisciplinary major provides students with both a broad-based foundation in the social sciences and with a variety of course choices, allowing a student to focus on a specific topic or theme, such as global studies, family studies, or multi-cultural studies.  Further, the major also enables students to focus on social justice, sustainability research and policy, as well as secondary education. 

The objectives of the major are to emphasize social research methodology and analytical skills; provide a personalized learning environment for students through faculty mentored undergraduate research opportunities and cooperative education research; prepare students for graduate education in the social sciences and allied fields; assist students in discerning appropriate careers through advising; foster the growth and development of faculty through research, attendance at professional meetings, developing and directing public forums and discipline-related training workshops, and publication and presentation of scholarly work; express its strong commitment to public service by collaborating with agencies and organizations, such as Jane Goodall Institute, Housatonic Valley Association, Connecticut State Archaeology Office and Institute for American Indian Studies, and with regional elementary, junior and senior high school educators to promote social sciences education. 

 

Learning Outcomes

At the completion of their studies, Social Science majors will demonstrate:

  1. Mastery of or proficiency in the theories and concepts of their field in the social sciences.
  2. Mastery of or proficiency in the research methodologies of the social sciences.
  3. Mastery of or proficiency in the application of their skills/ behaviors in the social sciences.
  4. Mastery of or proficiency in information technology and literacy.

 

Degree Programs in Social Sciences

Degree and minor programs require a minimum GPA of 2.0. All department majors are required to earn at least a “C” (2.0) minimum grade in any foundation course (100 level or as specified and required in the student’s major program) and in the three required methods courses: SS 201, SS 300 and SS 400. Students should contact the department chair in order to sign up for their required research seminar, SS 400, one semester prior to registration.

An electronically submitted portfolio of work in the social sciences is required of all students during the final semester before graduation. Four elements of the portfolio include:

1) Two “Course of Study” statements.

  1. a) A written discussion of the student’s course of study, including courses contributing to scholarly development, steps taken to meet challenges in that development, and future plans based on the course of study;
  2. b) A proposal of a significant question or line of inquiry of importance to the student in the major and an account of having arrived at that question or inquiry. Included will be a discussion of several research sources of bearing on the student’s question or inquiry, and a critical response to the inquiry’s assumptions or a proposal for a methodology that answering the question would require.

2) A research paper (previously submitted in a major course).

3) A senior thesis (previously submitted in SS 400: Senior Research Thesis).

4) A professional résumé and sample cover letter. 

Details of the below listed programs are presented on the next several pages.

Bachelor of Arts
Anthropology/Sociology
Economics
Political Science
Social Sciences:  Students may keep it general with no specific option, or students may choose one of the below options.
Options:
-Family Studies
-Global Studies
-Multi-cultural Studies 

Minor Programs
Anthropology
Conflict Resolution
Cultural Resource Management
Economics
Geography
International Studies
Multi-cultural Studies (with elective African-American focus)
Political Science
Sociology
Urban Studies
Women’s Studies

 


Bachelor of Arts Anthropology/Sociology (B.A.)

Description: The allied fields of anthropology and sociology offer ways of understanding the world that are fundamental to many courses of study. Anthropology and sociology look at everyday life in the context of groups, societies and cultures to which humankind contribute. The program is designed to provide background for business, government and social service careers, as well as for advanced graduate studies in a wide area of disciplines. 

Degree Requirements
All degrees at WCSU require 120 semester hours (SH).  This includes major requirements, general education requirements, cognates (where applicable), and free electives. This structure provides room for minors, internships, and study abroad.   

Required Courses in the Major: 42 SH.   

ANT 100 Intro to Cultural Anthropology (IC)  3 SH 
ANT 110 Intro to Physical Anthropology OR ANT 104 Intro to Archaeology (CT, IC)  3 SH 
SOC 100 Intro to Sociology (CT, IC)  3 SH 
SOC 101 Social Problems  3 SH 
ANT/SOC 330 Social and Cultural Theory  3 SH 
SS 201 Researching Social Issues  3 SH 
SS 300 Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences (QR)  3 SH 
SS 400 Senior Research Thesis (Students must contact Department Advisor one semester prior to registering for this course).  (CE, W3)  3 SH 
Required Major Electives: Eighteen (18) semester hours/Six (6) courses in two tiers. 
Tier 1: Three 200-400 level courses in ANT and/or SOC  9 SH 
Tier 2: Three 300-400 level courses in ANT and/or SOC  9 SH 
General Education Competencies:
IC (1-2 classes) – At least one IC course must be ANT, SOC, or NWC
W3 (1-2 classes) – At least one W3 course must be fulfilled by SS 400
CE (1-2 classes) – At least one CE course must be fulfilled by SS 400
Minimum Grade of C required for all courses in the Major. 
Minimum GPA for the BA in Anthropology/Sociology = 2.0. 


General Education
: All students must complete the General Education curriculum. General Education Requirements include both competency and breadth requirements. In some cases, major courses will satisfy competencies. These are indicated in the parentheses after the course title. For a complete description of the General Education program, follow this link. https://catalogs.wcsu.edu/ugrad/academic-programs-degrees/ 

Cognates: In some programs there are courses outside of the major that are required as pre-requisites or enhancements to the major course work. These courses may satisfy competencies and they will count toward the general education breadth requirement. If cognate courses are required, they are included in the list of courses required in the major.  

Electives: All degrees require 120 semester hours.  Elective credits are opportunities for minors, internships, study abroad, and just following general interests. We encourage all students to speak with their advisors about great opportunities for their elective courses.  


Sample Four Year Plan: BA Anthropology/Sociology

Four-year plans are suggestions. Plans change. Consult your advisor to adjust your plan.  

Semester 1  SH  Semester 2  SH 
ANT 100 Intro to Cultural Anthropology (IC)  3  SOC 100 Intro to Sociology (CT, IC, RPT 1)  3 
First Year Navigation (FY)  1-3  Gen Ed: Information Literacy (IL)  3 
PSY 100 Intro to Psych
OR ANT/SOC Culture and Personality
3  Gen Ed: Writing Tier 2 (W2)  3 
MAT 100(P) Intermediate Math OR Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning (QR) 3-4  Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning (QR) OR Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
World Language (IC)*  3  World Language (IC)  3 
NWC course (100 level)
OR GEO course (100-400 level) – only if FY is 1 SH
 
3     
       
Semester 3  SH  Semester 4  SH 
ANT 110 Physical Anthropology OR ANT 104 Intro to Archaeology (CT/IC)   3  SOC 101 Social Problems  

OR ANT/SOC Elective Tier 1 

3 
ANT/SOC Elective Tier 1  

OR SOC 101 Social Problems  

3  SS 201 Research Social Issues 

OR ANT/SOC Elective Tier 1 

3 
Gen Ed: Scientific Inquiry (SI)  4  Gen Ed: Oral Communication (OC)  3 
Gen Ed: Creative Process (CP)  3  Gen Ed: Health and Wellness (HW)  2-3 
Gen Ed: Critical Thinking (CT, RPT2)  3  Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
       
Semester 5  SH  Semester 6  SH 
SS 201 Research Social Issues OR ANT/SOC 330 Social & Cultural Theory   3  SS 300 Quant. Research Methods (QR, RPT3) OR Free Elective  3 
ANT SOC Elective Tier 1 or Tier 2  3  ANT SOC Elective Tier 1 or Tier 2  3 
ANT SOC Elective Tier 1 or Tier 2  3  ANT SOC Elective Tier 1 or Tier 2  3 
Gen Ed: Breadth or Free Elective  3  Gen Ed: Repeat 3  3 
Free Elective  3  Free Elective  3 
       
Semester 7    Semester 8   
ANT/SOC 330 Social & Cultural Theory OR SS 300 Quant. Research Methods (QR, RPT3)   3  SS 400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (CE, W3) (Advisor review required.)  3 
ANT/SOC Elective Tier 2  3  ANT/SOC Elective Tier 2  3 
ANT/SOC Elective Tier 2 OR Free Elective  3  Free Electives  9 
Free Electives  6  Free Elective  3 
Minimum C or better for all courses required for the Major. 

Complete study of World Language at an elementary II level or above.

Total Credits Required for the BA in Anthropology Sociology = 120; Minimum GPA 2.0. 


*Students who have completed three years of language in high school with at least a ‘C’ average have satisfied this requirement. Consult your advisor.

 


Bachelor of Arts in Economics (B.A.)

Description: The economics program provides students with an understanding and appreciation of the economic behavior of individuals, business and society. The focus is on social outcomes of economic transactions and events, as well as on economic performance. Economics is taught as part of a liberal arts education at Western and provides an especially relevant background for careers in business, finance, international organizations or government, as well as for graduate study in economics, law or business. 

Degree Requirements
All degrees at WCSU require 120 semester hours (SH). This includes major requirements, general education requirements, cognates (where applicable), and free electives. This structure provides room for minors, internships, and study abroad.   

Required Courses in the Major: 39 Semester Hours.  

ECO 211 Principles of Macroeconomics (pre-req MAT 118 or higher)  3 SH 
ECO 213 Principles of Microeconomics (pre-req MAT 118 or higher)  3 SH 
ECO 318 Intermediate Microeconomics  3 SH 
ECO 319 Intermediate Macroeconomics  3 SH 
SS 201 Researching Social Issues  3 SH 
SS 300 Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences (QR)  3 SH 
SS 400 Senior Research Thesis OR ECO 450 Seminar in Economics Research (Students must contact their Department advisor one semester prior to registering for this course).  (CE, W3)  3 SH 
Major Electives: Select any six economics courses 200 level or above.   18 SH 
Cognate   
MAT 181 Calculus I OR MAT 118 Elementary Applied Mathematics (QR)  3-4 SH 
Students must earn a C (2.0) or better SS 201, 300, and 400, and 2.0 in the major. 
Minimum GPA for the BA in Economics = 2.0. 


General Education
: All students must complete the General Education curriculum. General Education Requirements include both competency and breadth requirements. In some cases, major courses will satisfy competencies. These are indicated in the parentheses after the course title. For a complete description of the General Education program, follow this link. https://catalogs.wcsu.edu/ugrad/academic-programs-degrees/ 

Cognates: In some programs there are courses outside of the major that are required as pre-requisites or enhancements to the major course work. These courses may satisfy competencies and they will count toward the breadth requirement. Where applicable, cognates are indicated in the list of courses required in the major.  

Electives: All degrees require 120 semester hours.  Elective credits are opportunities for minors, internships, study abroad, and just following general interests. We encourage all students to speak with their advisors about great opportunities for their elective courses.  

 

Sample Four Year Plan: BA Economics
Four-year plans are suggestions. Plans change. Consult your advisor to adjust your plan.  

Semester 1  SH  Semester 2  SH 
Gen Ed: Information Literacy (IL)  3  Gen Ed: Oral Communication (OC)  3 
First Year Navigation (FY)  1-3  Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
WRT 101 Composition I  3  Gen Ed: Writing Tier 2 (W2)  3 
MAT 100(P) Intermediate Math OR Cognate: MAT 181 Calc OR MAT 118 Elementary Applied Math (QR)  3-4  Cognate: MAT 181 Calc OR MAT 118 Elementary Applied Math (QR) OR Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
Foreign Language (IC)*  3  Foreign Language (IC, RPT 1)  3 
Free Elective (Only if FY is 1 SH)  3     
       
Semester 3  SH  Semester 4  SH 
ECO 213 Principles of Microeconomics OR ECO 211 Principles of Macroeconomics (CT) Pre-req MAT 118 or higher.  3  ECO 211 Principles of Macroeconomics OR ECO 213 Principles of Microeconomics (CT, RPT 2) Pre-req MAT 118 or higher.  3 
SS 201 Researching Social Issues OR Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3  SS 201 Researching Social Issues OR Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
Gen Ed: Scientific Inquiry (SI)  4  Gen Ed: Oral Communication (OC)  3 
Gen Ed: Creative Process (CP)  3  Gen Ed: Health and Wellness (HW)  2-3 
Gen Ed: RPT Competency 3  3  Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
       
Semester 5  SH  Semester 6  SH 
SS 300 Quant. Research Methods in the Social Sciences (QR, RPT3) OR Free Elective  3  SS 300 Quant. Research Methods in the Social Sciences (QR, RPT3) OR Free Elective  3 
ECO 319 Intermediate Macroeconomics  3  ECO 318 Intermediate Microeconomics  3 
Major Elective 1   3  Major Elective 3  3 
Major Elective 2  3  Major Elective 4   3 
Free Elective  3  Gen Ed: Breadth or Free Elective  3 
Semester 7    Semester 8   
SS 400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar/ECO 450 Seminar in Economics Research (CE, W3) *** OR Free Elective  3  SS 400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar/ECO 450 Seminar in Economics Research (CE, W3) *** OR Free Elective  3 
Major Elective 5  3  Free Electives  12 
Major Elective 6  3     
Students must earn a C (2.0) or better SS 201, 300, and 400, and 2.0 in the major. 
Total Credits Required for the BA in Economics = 120; Minimum GPA 2.0. 

*Students who have completed three years of a foreign language at a C average in high school are not required to complete a foreign language requirement. However, for students in Economics, we strongly suggest that you consider exploring an additional foreign language or advancing your skills in the language studied in high school. Intercultural Competency is required. 

 


Bachelor of Arts in Political Science (B.A.)

Description: Students of political science are given an opportunity to develop a critical understanding of the political aspects of society. They are provided with a practical background for a variety of legal, government, public and social service careers, and a preparation for graduate studies in political science, as well as in related fields, such as pre-law.  

Degree Requirements 
All degrees at WCSU require 120 semester hours (SH).  This includes major requirements, general education requirements, cognates (where applicable), and free electives. This structure provides room for minors, internships, and study abroad.   

Required Courses in the Major: 39 semester hours (SH).  

PS 102 American Government  3 SH 
PS 104 World Governments  3 SH 
PS 200 International Relations or PS 201 Political Theory  3 SH 
SS 201 Researching Social Issues  3 SH 
SS 300 Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences (QR)  3 SH 
SS 400 Senior Research Thesis (Students must contact department advisor one semester prior to registering for this course).  (CE, W3)  3 SH 
Social Science Breadth: Select any two approved courses from ANT, ECO, GEO, HIS, or SOC (Contact your advisor for a list of approved courses.)  6 SH 
Major Electives: Select any five approved political science courses. (Contact your advisor for a list of approved courses.)  15 SH 
Students must earn a C (2.0) or better in all foundation courses (100 levels) and in SS 201, SS 330, and SS 400.  
You must earn a C or better in all courses in the major. 
Minimum GPA for the BA in Political Science = 2.0. 


General Education
: All students must complete the General Education curriculum. General Education Requirements include both competency and breadth requirements. In some cases, major courses will satisfy competencies. These are indicated in the parentheses after the course title. For a complete description of the General Education program, follow this link. https://catalogs.wcsu.edu/ugrad/academic-programs-degrees/ 

Cognates: In some programs there are courses outside of the major that are required as pre-requisites or enhancements to the major course work. These courses may satisfy competencies and they will count toward the breadth requirement. Where applicable, cognates are indicated in the list of courses required in the major.  

Electives: All degrees require 120 semester hours.  Elective credits are opportunities for minors, internships, study abroad, and just following general interests. We encourage all students to speak with their advisors about great opportunities for their elective courses.  


Sample Four Year Plan: BA Political Science

Four-year plans are suggestions. Plans change. Consult your advisor to adjust your plan.  

Semester 1  SH  Semester 2  SH 
PS 102 American Government (CT)  3  PS 104 World Governments (IC)  3 
First Year Navigation (FY)  1-3  Social Science Breadth 1  3 
WRT 101 Composition I  3  Gen Ed: Writing Tier 2 (W2)  3 
MAT 100(P) Intermediate Math OR Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning (QR)  3-4  Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning (QR) OR Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
Foreign Language (IC)*  3  Foreign Language (IC, RPT 1)  3 
Free Elective (Only if FY is 1 SH)  3     
       
Semester 3  SH  Semester 4  SH 
PS 200 International Relations  

OR PS 201 Political Theory  

OR Social Science Breadth 2 

3  PS 200 International Relations  

OR PS 201 Political Theory  

OR Social Science Breadth 2 

3 
SOC 101 Social Problems  

OR SS 201 Research Social Issues 

3  SOC 101 Social Problems  

OR SS 201 Research Social Issues 

3 
Gen Ed: Scientific Inquiry (SI)  4  Gen Ed: Oral Communication (OC)  3 
Gen Ed: Creative Process (CP)  3  Gen Ed: Health and Wellness (HW)  2-3 
Gen Ed: RPT Competency 2  3  Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
       
Semester 5  SH  Semester 6  SH 
SS 300 Quant. Research Methods in the Social Sciences (QR, RPT3)  

OR Free Elective 

3  SS 300 Quant. Research Methods in the Social Sciences (QR, RPT3)  

OR Free Elective 

3 
Major Elective 1  3  Major Elective 3  3 
Major Elective 2  3  Major Elective 4  3 
NWC Major Elective  3  Gen Ed: Breadth or Free Elective  3 
Free Elective  3  Free Elective  3 
       
Semester 7  SH  Semester 8  SH 
SS 400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (CE, W3) *** OR Free Elective  3  SS 400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (CE, W3) *** OR Free Elective  3 
Major Elective 5  3  Free Electives  12 
You must earn a C or better in all courses in the major. 
Total Credits Required for the BA in Political Science = 120; Minimum GPA 2.0. 

*Students who have completed three years of a foreign language at a C average in high school are not required to complete a foreign language requirement. However, for students in political science, we strongly suggest that you consider exploring an additional foreign language or advancing your skills in the language studied in high school. Intercultural Competency is required. 

 


Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences (B.A.)

Description: The allied fields of anthropology and sociology offer ways of understanding the world that are fundamental to many courses of study. Anthropology and sociology look at everyday life in the context of groups, societies and cultures to which humankind contribute. The program is designed to provide background for business, government and social service careers, as well as for advanced graduate studies in a wide area of disciplines. 

Degree Requirements
All degrees at WCSU require 120 semester hours (SH).  This includes major requirements, general education requirements, cognates (where applicable), and free electives. This structure provides room for minors, internships, and study abroad.   

Required Courses in the Major: 48 SH  

HIS 148 American History to 1877 (CT)  3 SH 
HIS 149 American History since 1877 (CT)  3 SH 
NWC: Non-Western Culture Elective  3 SH 
SOC 101 Social Problems  3 SH 
SS 201 Researching Social Issues  3 SH 
SS 300 Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences (QR)  3 SH 
SS 400 Senior Research Thesis (Students must contact Department Advisor one semester prior to registering for this course).  (CE, W3)  3 SH 
Social science foundation courses: SOC 100 Intro to Sociology (CT, IC) PLUS any two of the following ANT 100 Intro to Cultural Anthropology (IC), ECO 211 Principles of Macroeconomics (CT); GEO 100 Principles of World Geography; PS 100 Intro to Political Science OR PS 102 American Government.    9 SH 
Required Major Electives: Eighteen (18) semester hours/Six (6) courses in two tiers. 
Tier 1: Three 200-400 level courses in ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC, or SS  

At least two courses must be ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC, and/or SS courses, and these courses may not be cross listed with JLA. May include one course in NWC or SOC/JLA 201, 205, 334, or 336. 

9 SH 
Tier 2: Three 300-400 level courses in ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC, or SS  

At least one course must be ANT, ECO, GEO, PS, SOC, and/or SS courses, and these courses may not be cross listed with JLA. May include one of the following: SOC/JLA 334 or 336. 

9 SH 
Minimum Grade of C required for all courses in the Major. 
Cognates 
HIS 186 Europe: Ancient & Medieval  3 
HIS 187 Modern Europe  3 
PSY 100 Intro to Psychology  3 
Non-Western Culture Elective  3 
Minimum GPA for the BA in Social Sciences = 2.0. 


General Education
: All students must complete the General Education curriculum. General Education Requirements include both competency and breadth requirements. In some cases, major courses will satisfy competencies. These are indicated in the parentheses after the course title. For a complete description of the General Education program, follow this link. https://catalogs.wcsu.edu/ugrad/academic-programs-degrees/ 

Cognates: In some programs there are courses outside of the major that are required as pre-requisites or enhancements to the major course work. These courses may satisfy competencies and they will count toward the breadth requirement. Where applicable, cognates are indicated in the list of courses required in the major.  

Electives: All degrees require 120 semester hours.  Elective credits are opportunities for minors, internships, study abroad, and just following general interests. We encourage all students to speak with their advisors about great opportunities for their elective courses.  


Sample Four Year Plan: BA Social Sciences

Four-year plans are suggestions. Plans change. Consult your advisor to adjust your plan.  

Semester 1  SH  Semester 2  SH 
Social Science Foundation 1   3  Social Science Foundation 2   3 
First Year Navigation (FY)  1-3  HIS 149 Amer. Hist. Since 1877 (CT, Rpt. 1)  3 
WRT 101 Composition I (W1)  3  Gen Ed: Writing Tier 2 (W2)  3 
MAT 100(P) Intermediate Math OR 

HIS 148 American Hist. to 1877 (CT)   

3-4  Gen Ed: Quantitative Reasoning (QR) OR Gen Ed: Breadth Elective  3 
Foreign Language (IC)*   3  Foreign Language (IC)   3 
Free Elective (Only if FY is 1 SH)  3     
       
Semester 3  SH  Semester 4  SH 
Social Science Foundation 3  3  Tier 1 Major Elective 1   3 
SOC 101 Social Problems  

OR Gen Ed: Creative Process (CP)  

3  SOC 101 Social Problems OR SS 201 Research Social Issues  3 
Gen Ed: Scientific Inquiry (SI)  4  Gen Ed: Oral Communication (OC)  3 
HIS 186 Europe:  Ancient & Medieval   3  HIS 187 Modern Europe  3 
PSY 100 Intro to Psych OR NWC ELECTIVE  3  PSY 100 Intro to Psych OR NWC ELECTIVE   3 
       
Semester 5  SH  Semester 6  SH 
SS 201 Research Social Issues OR Gen Ed: Creative Process (CP)   3  SS 300 Quant. Research Methods (QR, RPT3) OR Free Elective  3 
Gen Ed: RPT Competency 2   3  Tier 1 Major Elective 3  3 
Tier 1 Major Elective 2  3  Tier 2 Major Elective 1  3 
NWC Major Elective  3  Gen Ed: Information Literacy (IL)  3 
Free Elective  3  Free Elective  3 
       
Semester 7  SH  Semester 8  SH 
SS 300 Quant. Research Methods (QR, RPT3) OR SS 400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (CE, W3) ***  3  SS 400 Senior Thesis Research Seminar (CE, W3) *** OR Free Elective  3 
Tier 2 Major Elective 2  3  Free Electives  12 
Gen Ed: Health and Wellness (HW)  2-3     
Free Electives  6     
Free Elective  3     
Minimum C or better for all courses required for the Major. 
Total Credits Required for the BA in Social Sciences = 120; Minimum GPA 2.0. 

*Students who have completed three years of a foreign language at a C average in high school are not required to complete a foreign language requirement. However, for students in social sciences, we strongly suggest that you consider exploring an additional foreign language or advancing your skills in the language studied in high school. Intercultural Competency is required. 

 

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Minor Programs

Minor in Conflict Resolution
Faculty Advisor: J. Schofield

To successfully negotiate today’s stressful and competitive environment, people require highly refined communication and conflict resolution skills. This minor program in conflict management allows students to learn about, practice and further develop some key fundamental behaviors designed to establish powerful rapport with others, and to manage conflict creatively and constructively when it occurs. In addition, the knowledge and insights gained in the basic core courses heighten intellectual pursuits in many other disciplines, such as political science, sociology, economics, history, psychology, communication, theater arts, social work, criminal justice and law, and management.

To enroll in this minor program, contact the program adviser listed above. In addition to two required foundation courses, SS 401 and PS 401 or SS 402, your adviser will help you select four additional elective courses from the list below. The program adviser may approve other elective courses if content is deemed relevant to the program. No more than six credit hours should be selected from any one discipline or from the student’s major. The conflict resolution minor program sheet/guide is available from the program adviser.

Required Foundation Courses

SS 401 Fundamentals of Conflict Resolution AND
SS 402 Mediation: Theory & Practice OR  PS 401 Global Conflict Resolution

Electives offered by the Dept. of Social Sciences:
ANT/COM 208 Intercultural Communication
ANT/SOC 322 Comparative Minority Relations
ECO 308 Labor Economics
ECO 321 Urban Economics
PS 200 International Relations
PS 290 Geopolitics in the 20th Century
PS 402 Violent & Nonviolent Conflict Resolution
PS 403 International Institutions
SOC 101 Social Problems
SOC 200 Concepts of Race & Ethnic Relations
SOC 202 Class, Status & Power
SOC 210 Urban Society
SS 299 Student Developed Study

Electives offered by other departments:
COM 210 Nonverbal Communication
COM 212 Effective Listening
COM 362 Organizational Communication
COM 408 Strategies of Persuasion
HIS 256 Background to the Civil War
HIS 382 Contemporary Middle East
JLA 426 Conflict Resolution & Management
MGT 350 Management Negotiations
MGT 376 Managing People
PSY 205 Social Psychology
SW 220 Cultural Diversity

Minor in Geography
Faculty Advisor: C. Bandhauer 

Eighteen semester hours, consisting of three required courses and three electives. Specialized knowledge in one world region or country is encouraged.  Emphasizing the interaction between humans and geo-physical environments, this minor explores the fundamental importance of location, place, region and the inter-relationships between differing localities in order to master geographic skills and knowledge.  Experience in spatial analysis skills includes data management, map reading, collation and presentation of geographical information, and related inferential thinking about human and geo-physical relationships. Spatial interactions, including trade, environmental management systems, as well as natural environmental conditions all contribute to a developing knowledge of world regions, countries, cities, and cultures.  Finally, cultural differences, development prospects, and the importance of environmental management and conservation are also considered. 

Requirements
GEO 100 Principles of World Geography
GEO 215 Geographical Information Systems (offered every spring)
GEO 270 Geography of Environment and Development (offered every spring)

Electives: (at least two of which must be at the 200 level or above)
GEO 290 Geopolitics in the Twenty-First Century
GEO 250 USA and Canada: A Regional Study
GEO 252 Latin America: A Regional Study
GEO 253 Russia and Euro-Asia: A Regional Study
ENV/GEO 150 Urban Environment as an Ecological Problem
ES 103 Planet Earth
AAS/GEO 251 Africa: A Regional Study
HIS/AAS 219 African-American History and Culture (contemporary)
NWC 103 Chinese Culture
NWC 104 Japanese Culture
NWC 105 Cultures of India
NWC 107 Middle Eastern Culture
NWC/AAS109 Equatorial African Cultures
NWC 110 Vietnamese Culture
NWC 112 Korean Culture
NWC/AAS 113 Southern African Cultures
NWC 115 Latin American and Caribbean Civilizations

Other electives with significant geographical components will be considered at the discretion of the faculty adviser.

Minor in International Studies: Interdisciplinary
Faculty Advisor: R. Whittemore

Eighteen semester hours are required.

The object of the international studies minor is to encourage students to adopt a more expansive view of the world around them.

As a world power the United States continues to be more and more involved in the political, economic and cultural affairs of many countries. Our own security is dependent to an important degree on our relations with other countries, large and small. Many American jobs are dependent on overseas markets. Our well-being, therefore, depends on the understanding of foreign peoples, their histories and cultures. Giving our students some recognition in the form of an international studies minor may very well assist them in their career goals no matter what their majors happen to be.

To fulfill the requirements of the international studies minor the student must:

  1. Satisfactorily complete four 200-level or above courses, the content of which are substantially international in nature. The faculty advisor will have a list of the appropriate courses. These four courses must be selected from at least two of the following six interdisciplinary categories: 
  2. ANT/SOC/SS
    2. ED/HED
    3. ECO/FIN/MKT
    4. FR/SPA
    5. ENG/COM/PHI
    6. GEO/HIS/PS
  3. Satisfactorily complete two 100-level courses which examine cultures other than European or American (NWC designations).

Minor in Multi-cultural Studies (with elective African-American Focus)
Faculty Advisor: R. Whittemore

Eighteen semester hours are required.

In addition to the required course, SOC 200 Concepts of Race and Racism, courses may include those listed for the Multi-cultural Studies Option in Social Sciences as well as any course from any other discipline (100-400 level), provided (a) the student requests and receives approval from the Minor Faculty Adviser and (b) the university catalog course descriptions of those alternative courses indicate substantial ethnic, minority and cultural diversity subject coverage.

If at least 12 semester hours are in African-American studies (AAS) courses (100-400 level), the student’s transcript shall read: minor in multi-cultural studies: African-American focus.

Minor in Urban Studies
Faculty Advisor: C. Banhauer

The urban studies minor is an interdisciplinary program focusing on urban issues, concepts, and problems. The minor affords students the opportunity to explore urban concerns through a variety of disciplinary lenses and the chance to examine practical solutions to urban problems. The minor also prepares students for increased employment possibilities at the municipal, state, or federal level, or for graduate work in one of several areas related to urban studies (e.g., urban studies, urban, town, or regional planning, urban geography, demography, etc.).

Students select 18 semester hours from the courses listed below; no more than nine hours should be from 100-level courses and no more than six hours should be selected from any one discipline or from the student’s major. Students are strongly encouraged to apply 3-6 semester hours earned in an approved cooperative education internship to this program.

ANT 350 Modern & Postmodern Societies
ART 101 History and Appreciation of Western Art: Renaissance to the Present
ECO 211 Principles of Macroeconomics or ECO 107 Contemporary Domestic Economic Issues
ECO 321 Urban Economics
GEO/ENV 150 Urban Environment as a Human Ecological Problem
HIS 201 Immigrant NYC
HIS 208 Rise of Industrialism in America
HIS 363 The American City
HIS 368 New York City: History and Culture
HIS X99 Student Independent Study
PS 218 American State & Local Government
SS/CED 297 Coop Internship
SOC 101 Social Problems
SOC 210 Urban Sociology

Any appropriate substitute course must have prior department approval.

Minor in Women’s Studies (WS)
Faculty Advisor: C. Hegel-Cantarella 

The women’s studies minor is an interdisciplinary and interdepartmental program that provide the opportunity for students to increase their awareness and knowledge about women’s achievements and contributions to society, and about social concerns and issues that are of particular importance to women and to all minority groups.

The 18 credits in the minor shall consist of electives with a WS label or courses with a discipline label which are identified as relevant by a committee drawn from participating departments. Students should contact their faculty adviser for a list of recommended electives.

WS 200 Introduction to Women’s Studies
WS/ANT 236 Culture, Sex and Gender
WS/ANT 314 Native Peoples of the Southwest: Women, Spirituality and Power
WS/COM 211 Women, Language and Communication
WS/COM 444 Women and the Media in the U.S.
WS/ECO 327 Economics of Gender
WS/ENG 334 Women Writers
WS/HIS 320 Women and Leadership
WS/JLA 301 Women and Criminal Justice
WS/NUR 250 Women’s Health Issues
WS/PSY 217 Psychology of Women

Recommended cognate elective courses for Women’s Studies
SOC 221 Human Family Systems
SOC 305 Contemporary Family Problems
SW 220 Cultural Diversity